Tag Archives: judge

Week Eight Judge: Beth Deitchman

Our final week will be judged by LCP’s own Beth Deitchman!

Beth Deitchman has been a dancer, a university lecturer, and an actor. While studying Spanish in Panama in 2011 she re-discovered her passion for writing and has been scribbling ever since. Co-founder of Luminous Creatures Press, she has authored two books of the Regency Magic Series, Mary Bennet and the Bloomsbury Coven and Margaret Dashwood and the Enchanted Atlas, and co-authored two collections of short stories with fellow Creature Emily June Street. Beth is currently working on a novel about ballet dancers. She lives in Northern California with her husband Dave and dog Ralphie.

Beth has this to say about what Kind of flash fiction she likes: “Every word matters, so I like them to be well-chosen. I prefer stories with an arc over meditations on a theme or image. I also want some juicy narrative tension. And I admire panache.”

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(Beth huddles in a cavernous chair with her dog, Ralpie)

Week Seven Judge: Kristen Falso- Capaldi

Our judge for week seven is the lovely Kristen Falso-Capaldi, whose heartfelt stories capture realistic characters with deep emotions.

Kristen is the 2015 winner of the Victoria Hudson Emerging Writer Prize, and her story “The Absence of Cows” recently won first place in See the Elephant magazine’s New Voices Contest. Her fiction has also appeared in FlashDogs: An Anthology, Underground Voices magazine and on The Other Stories Podcast. She co-wrote a screenplay, Teachers: The Movie, which was an official selection for the 2014 Houston Comedy Film Festival. She is currently working on a novel. She lives in Rhode Island, USA.

You can follow Kristen on Twitter: @kristenafc

Week Five Judge: Nancy Chenier

Up next in LCP’s line-up of potent and powerful judges is the talented and oft-winning Nancy Chenier. With a penchant for spec-fiction, Nancy is the winner of many of LCP’s past contest rounds, not to mention a three-time winner at Flash! Friday and a regular winner/participant in many other online flash forums.

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Nancy says: “Although I gravitate toward speculative fiction, I’m finding the more I participate in the flash-fiction world, the more I’m drawn to tales with a strong emotional core, whether gut-wrenching or gut-bursting. I also look for a solid ending (probably because I find them the most difficult things to write).”

You can follow her blog, Spec-Fic Motley.

Week Four Judge: Margaret Locke

Experienced Flash Fictioneer Margaret Locke will be the arbiter of this week’s contest. You may know Margaret from Flash! Friday, where she contributes regularly and has judged in the past. You also may know her as the author of the fab contemporary romance A Man of Character, which came out earlier this year.

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A former doctoral student in medieval history turned stay-at-home-mom, Margaret is a self-proclaimed bookworm and a lover of romance novels. Keep an eye out for more books from Margaret in the romance genre!

As far as flash stories go, Margaret says, “I love sumptuous language, witty word play, finesse with language … and a story that evokes an emotional response in me. Humor is always appreciated, but anything that makes me feel, makes me want to keep reading, makes me go ‘Yes!’, makes me happy.”

She cautions that violence or graphic language will only be appreciated if necessary to the story’s context.

 

 

Week Two Judge: Summer of Super Short Stories 2

Week Two stories (prompts post Thursday!) will be judged by the discerning eyes of Tiffany Aldrich MacBain.

Here is a bit about her:

Tiffany Aldrich MacBain is an essayist and an Associate Professor of English at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA. Her writing has appeared in Creative Colloquy, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Arizona Quarterly. Currently she is working on a series of personal essays about the experience of mothering from within a children’s hospital, and she is writing a scholarly article on the travel journals of a landscape painter who lived in Tacoma at the turn of the 20th century. She blogs intermittently at www.amerethread.blogspot.com.